Tbilisi National Park is one of nine national parks in Georgia, located to the north of the city of Tbilisi. The historical town of Mtskheta lies right outside of the western boundary of the park. The national park was established in 1973 on the basis of the previously existed Saguramo National Reserve (established in 1946) and is the oldest national park in Georgia. The area of the park is 243 square kilometres (94 sq mi)


Vake Park (Georgian: ვაკის პარკი) is a public park in Tbilisi. The park was opened in 1946 and is located in the Vake district of Tbilisi at the western end of Chavchavadze Avenue.


Mtatsminda Park is a family amusement facility located atop Mount Mtatsminda overlooking the Georgian capital Tbilisi. It offers carrousels, water slides, a roller-coaster, and a big Ferris Wheel at the edge of the mountain, offering a splendid view over the city.


The Tbilisi sea (Georgian: თბილისის წყალსაცავი) or Tbilisi reservoir is an artificial lake in the vicinity of Tbilisi that serves as a reservoir. The lake has a length of 8.75 km and a width of 2.85 km. It was opened in 1953 and has become a popular recreation spot.It is planned to develop the Tbilisi sea into a recreational park with various sports facilities


The National Botanical Garden of Georgia (Georgian: საქართველოს ეროვნული ბოტანიკური ბაღი), formerly the Tbilisi Botanical Garden (თბილისის ბოტანიკური ბაღი) is located in Tbilisi, capital of Georgia, and lie in the Tsavkisis-Tskali Gorge on the southern foothills of the Sololaki Range (a spur of the Trialeti Range). It occupies the area of 161 hectares and possesses a collection of over 4,500 taxonomic groups.

Its history spans more than three centuries. It was first described, in 1671, by the French traveler Jean Chardin as royal gardens which might have been founded at least in 1625 and were variably referred to as "fortress gardens" or "Seidabad gardens" later in history. The gardens appear in the records by Joseph Pitton de Tournefort (1701) and on the Tbilisi map composed by Prince Vakhushti (1735). Pillaged in the Persian invasion of 1795, the garden was revived in the early 19th century and officially established as the Tiflis Botanical Garden in 1845.